<
Home
Information
Academic
Courses
Undergraduate Courses
The following is a list of the undergraduate courses I have taken, in reverse chronological order (such that my most recent courses are at the top):
ADVANCED LINEAR ALGEBRA AND APPLICATIONS
MATH2055
Dr. Jane Breen
The purpose of this course is to further the study of important topics in linear algebra with an emphasis on applications. The main theoretical topics include: Euclidean vector spaces, general vector spaces, inner product spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, linear transformations and complex vector spaces. Possible additional topics and applications include least square fitting of data, LU-decompositions, Markov chains, graph theory and cubic spline approximations. A goal of the course is to introduce students to proof techniques in Linear Algebra.
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
MATH2060
Dr. Gregory Lewis
A study of differential equations and difference equations that arise as models of phenomena in many branches of physical and biological sciences, in engineering, and in social scienes. Examples include Newtonian mechanics, chemical kinetics, and ecological system models. Students learn the basic properties of differential and difference equations, techniques for solving them, and a range of applications.
SOFTWARE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
CSCI2040
Michael Lombardo
This course introduces students to the development of software systems that consist of multiple programs with long life cycles. Topics covered in this course include software process, software requirements, software architecture, design patterns, notations, and techniques for software design and analysis.
COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE I
CSCI2072
Dr. Gregory Lewis
This course provides an overview of and pracatice experience using algorithms for solving numerical problems arising in applied sciences. Topics include: computer arithmetic, interpolation and data-fitting, numerical differentiation and integration, solution of differential equations, and elements of numerical linear algebra. Students will use computer software such as Maple or Matlab in the solution of numerical problems.
HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
SSCI1210
Dr. Amanda Robinson
This course will focus on the history and philosophy of science and engineering with special emphasis on scientific technology and the cultural significance of technology to civilization. The course will include critical analyses and will pay significant attention on the nature and problems of industrial technology, benefits and risks of technological progress, and issues around intellectual property. Throughout, students will examine the history and philosophy within the context of science and engineering as learned professions.
DISCRETE MATHEMATICS FOR COMPUTER SCIENTISTS
CSCI2110
Dr. Mihai Beligan
This is an elementary introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics covered include first-order logic, set theory, number theory, fundamental techniques of mathematical proof, relations, functions, induction and recursion, combinatorics, discrete probability, finite-state machines, and graph theory.
DATA STRUCTURES
CSCI2010
Michael Lombardo
This course introduces students to the analysis of algorithms and data structures in an object-oriented programming language. Topics include problem analysis, design of algorithms and programs, selection of data types, decision-making, program correctness and programming style.
SCIENTIFIC DATA ANALYSIS
CSCI2000
Mariana Shimabukuro
The principal goal of this course is to build computational skills required for analyzing scientific data in a variety of data formats (e.g. CSV, text, binary, sound, image, etc.). Topics include: automation of data analysis tasks using command-line user interfaces (e.g., the Unix shell); managing code and data using a version control system; modular programming for scientific data analysis; debugging and testing scientific software; plotting data (i.e., two- and three-dimensional graphics).
STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCES
STAT2010
Dr. Qi Hong (Ruth) Li
This course introduces the concepts and techniques of statistics and probability to colt, present, analyze and interpret data, and make decisions in the presence of variability. Students study a selection of topics relevant to physical science, selected from: basic concepts of probability theory: events, sample spaces, probability; basic concepts of discrete mathematics: set theory, propositional logic, combinatorics; probability: marginal probability, conditional probability, independence, discrete and continuous random variables; probability distributions: binomial, Poisson, uniform, normal, etc.; mean and variance; the central limit theorem; statistical inference: estimation, significance tests, confidence intervals; one way analysis of variance tests; introduction to experimental design.
IMPACTS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ON SOCIETY
SSCI1470
Dr. Andrew Muncaster
In this course, students will engage in analyses of scientific and technological developments from the perspective of broad social impacts. Special attention will be paid to controversial issues currently receiving media attention, but the major emphasis will be on ways of thinking critically about both the remediation of already existing problems (e.g. toxic substance clean-up) and the prevention of future problems (e.g. environmental impact analyses and or economic impact analyses). Canadian examples will be of primary concern, but students will also learn to think about impact globally since large-scale problems do not respect political boundaries.
PHYSICS II
PHY1020U
Dr. Zahraa Ibrahim
Introduction to electromagnetism and optics: electric charge and Coulomb’s law; electric field, electric flux, Gauss’ law; electrostatic potential, capacitance; Kirchoff’s laws in DC circuits. Magnetic forces and magnetic field; Biot-Savart law; Ampere’s law; magnetic flux, Faraday’s law, inductance; AC circuits. Electromagnetic waves; wave propagation; waves in matter. Geometrical and wave optics; special relativity.
COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP
BUSI2000U
Dr. Igor Kotlyar
This course intends to develop critical employability skills such as teamwork, leadership, project management, communication skills and intercultural understanding, and will focus students’ learning on topics related to interactions with others in personal, educational and professional contexts. Students will engage in collective and dynamic learning activities involving direct and practical application of the content/skills critical to professional success. They will explore the practice and impact of leadership, negotiations and teamwork in organizations and communities. These practices will be examined in a variety of settings as described in both popular and academic writings. Learning activities will be directed toward developing leadership for exceptional performance, obtaining commitment to goals and standards, negotiating and resolving conflict, inter-cultural communications, ethical practice, and relating with others in team environments.
LINEAR ALGEBRA
MATH2050U
Dr. Mihai Beligan
This course is designed to develop the fundamental ideas of linear algebra, and to demonstrate some applications of linear algebra to other areas. Topics include the algebra of matrices; qualitative and quantitative solutions of systems of linear equations; determinants and matrix inverses; real and complex vector spaces, and subspaces, linear independence, bases, dimension and co-ordinates; inner product spaces and the Gram-Schmidt process; inconsistent (over determined) systems of equations, least squares solutions and regression; linear maps and matrices, change of basis and similar matrices; eigenvalues, eigenvectors and matrix diagonalization; diagonalization of real symmetric matrices and quadratic forms.
CALCULUS II
MATH1020U
Dr. Mihai Beligan
A continuation of Calculus I or Introductory Calculus emphasizing integral calculus: problem solving, calculations and applications. Applications to volumes, arc length, polar co-ordinates and functions of two or more variables. Multivariable calculus: partial derivatives, differential equations, Taylor and MacLauren series, double integrals.
PROGRAMMING WORKSHOP II
CSCI1061U
Dr. Jonathan Gillett
This is a second intensive course on computer programming that continues from CSCI 1060U and covers more advanced theory and practice. The lectures introduce modern concepts in program design and construction for larger scale programs. The laboratories provide an opportunity to apply these concepts. Topics that are covered in this course include advanced program design, design patterns, program refactoring, templates and standard template libraries, data structures, debugging and version control.
COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
CSCI2050U
Dr. Randy Fortier
This course introduces the basic ideas of computer organization and underlying digital logic that implements a computer system. Starting from representation of information, the course looks at logic elements used for storing and processing information. The course also discusses how the information storage and processing elements are linked together to function as a computer system. Students become familiar with the basic hardware components of a system and how they are connected, and see how secondary storage, registers and control units must co-ordinate to provide an effective environment for application programming. The components of a multi-level memory, and how it interfaces with the I/O and central processor, are examined.
TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMM1050U
Dr. Antonie Scholtz
This course will assist students in developing professional writing and presentation skills required for university assignments and for their professional work in the future. It will start with basic writing and speaking skills and will emphasize their application in the preparation of reports and other technical writing. Topics for the course include using correct grammar and punctuation, organizing ideas, formulating persuasive arguments, and preparing narrative and written technical reports. Part of the process will involve students in the critical analysis of the writing and speaking of others as a means of developing one’s own skills.
PHYSICS I
PHY1010U
Dr. Joseph MacMillan
This calculus-based course is intended for students who have completed high school calculus. It gives an introduction to basic mechanics, Newton’s laws of motion; kinematics and dynamics in one and two dimensions; work and energy; friction; momentum and collisions; angular momentum, torque and rotation of rigid bodies; gravitation; simple harmonic motion; mechanical and sound waves; static equilibrium; fluid mechanics; kinetic theory of gases and thermodynamics.
CALCULUS I
MATH1010U
Dr. Nicholas Faulkner
Applications to science and engineering using differential calculus. Emphasis on limits, continuity, the derivative, Mean Value Theorem for derivatives and integrals, approximation by differentials, Fermat’s Theorem, differentiation and anti-differentiation, definite integrals, areas between curves, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
PROGRAMMING WORKSHOP I
CSCI1060U
Dr. Jeremy Bradbury
This is a first intensive course on computer programming that covers both theory and practice. The lectures introduce modern concepts in program design and construction along with features of modern object-oriented programming languages. The laboratories provide an opportunity to apply these concepts to practical programming problems. Topics that are covered in this course include program design, problem solving strategies, program documentation, memory management and object-oriented program design.
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE
CSCI1030U
Dr. Randy Fortier
This course introduces a broad range of concepts from the different areas of computer science. Topics covered include program solving, data structures and algorithms from areas such as artificial intelligence, computer architecture, networking and the Internet.